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The following are summaries of important research studies on early intensive behavioral intervention. These scientific studies are highlighted because they have been identified repeatedly as being the most rigorous and well-executed studies of their kind to document significant findings.

Studies Summaries of Results
Smith, T., Groen, A. D., & Wynn, J. (2000). Randomized trial of intensive early intervention for children with pervasive developmental disorder. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 105, 269-285. Children with autism or PDD-NOS who began an average of 24.5 hours per week of one-to-one ABA treatment between 18-42 months of age outperformed children in the parent training group on IQ, visual-spatial skills, language, & academics. Children in the ABA group gained an average of 16 IQ points and 27% achieved average post-treatment scores and were in regular education classrooms without support.
Eikeseth, S., Smith, T., Jahr, E., & Eldevik, S. (2002). Intensive behavioral treatment at school for 4- to 7-year-old children with autism. Behavior Modification, 26, 49-68;Eikeseth, S., Smith, T., Jahr, E., & Eldevik, S. (2007). Outcome for children with autism who began intensive behavioral treatment between ages 4 and 7: A comparison controlled study. Behavior Modification, 31, 264-278. Children with autism who began 28 hours per week of one-to-one ABA treatment between 4-7 years of age scored significantly higher as compared to the eclectic treatment group on intelligence, language, adaptive functioning, and maladaptive functioning and on two of the subscales on the socio-emotional assessment. Children in the ABA group gained an average of 25 IQ points and 54% scored within the average range on both IQ and verbal IQ at follow-up.
Howard, J., Sparkman, C., Cohen, H., Green, G., & Stanislaw, H. (2005). A comparison of intensive behavior analytic and eclectic treatments for young children with autism. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 26, 359-383. Children with autism or PDD-NOS who began 25-40 hours per week of one-to-one ABA treatment at a mean age of 36 months scored significantly higher as compared to an eclectic treatment group and a public early intervention group on measures of IQ, language functioning, and adaptive functioning. Children in the ABA group gained an average of 31 IQ points.
Cohen, H., Amerine-Dickens, M., & Smith, T. (2006). Early intensive behavioral treatment: Replication of the UCLA model in a community setting. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 27(2), 145-155. Children with autism or PDD-NOS who were diagnosed between 18-48 months of age and began 35-40 hours per week of one-to-one ABA treatment no later than 48 months of age scored significantly higher as compared to the public special education group on IQ and adaptive functioning. Children in the ABA group gained an average of 25 IQ points and 29% were included in regular education classrooms without support.
Remington, B., Hastings, R. P., Kovshoff, H., degli Espinosa, F., Jahr, E., & Brown, T. (2007). Early intensive behavioral intervention: Outcomes for children with autism and their parents after two years. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 112, 418-438. Children with autism who began 25.6 hours per week of one-to-one ABA treatment between 30-42 months of age scored significantly higher as compared to children in the local education group on intelligence. Children in the ABA group gained an average of 12 IQ points.
Lovaas, O. I. (1987). Behavioral treatment and normal educational and intellectual functioning in young autistic children. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 55, 3-9;McEachin, J. J., Smith, T., & Lovaas, O. I. (1993). Long-term outcome for children with autism who received early intensive behavioral treatment. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 97, 3569-372. Children with autism who began more than 40 hours per week of one-to-one ABA treatment at a mean age of 33.3 months scored significantly higher as compared to children receiving 0 to 10 hours per week of one-to-one ABA treatment on IQ and school placement. Children in the intensive ABA group gained an average of 30 IQ points more than children receiving minimal treatment. Also, 47% of children receiving intensive treatment achieved average post-treatment IQ scores and were succeeding in regular education classrooms. Follow-up assessments at a mean age of 11.5 years showed that children in the intensive treatment group maintained gains and had higher scores for IQ, adaptive behavior, and personality than children in the control group.
Eldevik, S., Eikeseth, S., Jahr, E., & Smith, T. (2006). Effects of low-intensity behavioral treatment for children with autism and mental retardation. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 211-224. Children with autism who began 12.5 hours per week of one-to-one ABA at an average of 51 months of age scored significantly higher than children in the eclectic treatment group on intelligence and language. Children in the ABA group gained an average of 8.2 IQ points.
Sallows, G. O., & Graupner, T. D. (2005). Intensive behavioral treatment for children with autism: Four-year outcome and predictors. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 110, 417-438. Children with autism who began 37.6 hours per week of one-to-one ABA treatment or 31.3 hours per week of parent managed ABA treatment at a mean age of 36 months had significant pretest to posttest gains for IQ, language comprehension and ADI-R Social Skills and ADI-R Communication. Children receiving ABA gained an average of 25 IQ points and 48% achieved average post-treatment scores and were succeeding in regular education classrooms.